SAJBD Condemns Racist Statements

Just one year after Penny Sparrow reached notoriety for her racist comments about beach-goers on the Durban coast, it is with a sense of déjà vu that the SA Jewish Board of Deputies (SAJBD) condemns yet another South African, Ben Sasanof, for similar offensive comments he made concerning the Durban beachfront this weekend. 

All forms of racism are unacceptable in a South Africa where we strive daily to build a culture based on human rights and principles of dignity and freedom, for all of who live in it.  The SAJBD calls on all South Africans to stand up and fight against discrimination wherever it is found. We have just celebrated Reconciliation Day, and now more than ever, we should be dedicated to building a non-racist country. 

The frequency with which these comments occur, again highlights the need for increased awareness and education of hate crimes, and the SAJBD hopes to see the implementation of the Hate Crimes Bill so that racism can be identified and appropriately sanctioned.

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